nakadi 0,0 travis-ci docker

A distributed event bus that implements a RESTful API abstraction instead of Kafka-like queues

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Table of Contents

Nakadi Event Broker

The goal of Nakadi (ნაკადი means "stream" in Georgian) is to provide an event broker infrastructure to:

  • Abstract event delivery via a secured RESTful API. This allows microservices teams to maintain service boundaries, and not directly depend on any specific message broker technology. Access to the API can be managed and secured using OAuth scopes.

  • Enable convenient development of event-driven applications and asynchronous microservices. Event types can be defined with schemas and managed via a registry. Nakadi also has optional support for events describing business processes and data changes using standard primitives for identity, timestamps, event types, and causality.

  • Efficient low latency event delivery. Once a publisher sends an event using a simple HTTP POST, consumers can be pushed to via a streaming HTTP connection, allowing near real-time event processing. The consumer connection has keepalive controls and support for managing stream offsets.

The project also provides compatability with the STUPS project. Additional features that we plan to cover in the future are:

  • Discoverability of the resource structures flowing into the broker.

  • A managed API that allows consumers to subscribe and have stream offsets stored by the server.

  • Filtering of events for subscribing consumers.

  • Role base access control to data.

  • Support for different streaming technologies and engines. Nakadi currently uses Apache Kafka as its broker, but other providers (such as Kinesis) will be possible.

More detailed information can be found on the manual.

Quickstart

You can run the project locally using Docker. Note that Nakadi requires very recent versions of docker and docker-compose. See Dependencies for more information.

Running a Server

From the project's home directory you can start Nakadi via Gradle:

./gradlew startNakadi

This will build the project and run docker compose with 4 services:

  • Nakadi (8080)
  • PostgreSQL (5432)
  • Kafka (9092)
  • Zookeeper (2181)

Stopping a Server

To stop the running Nakadi:

./gradlew stopNakadi

Mac OS Docker Settings

Since Docker for Mac OS runs inside Virtual Box, you will want to expose some ports first to allow Nakadi to access its dependencies:

docker-machine ssh default \
-L 9092:localhost:9092 \
-L 8080:localhost:8080 \
-L 5432:localhost:5432 \
-L 2181:localhost:2181

Alternatively you can set up port forwarding on the "default" machine through its network settings in the VirtualBox UI. If you get the message "Is the docker daemon running on this host?" but you know Docker and VirtualBox are running, you might want to run this command:

eval "$(docker-machine env default)"

Note: Docker for Mac OS (previously in beta) version 1.12 (1.12.0 or 1.12.1) currently is not supported due to the bug in networking host configuration.

API Overview and Usage

Events and Event Types

The Nakadi API allows the publishing and consuming of events over HTTP. To do this the producer must register an event type with the Nakadi schema registry.

The event type contains information such as the name, the owning application, strategies for partitioning and enriching data, and a JSON schema. Once the event type is created, a publishing resource becomes available that will accept events for the type, and consumers can also read from the event stream.

There are three main categories of event type defined by Nakadi -

  • Undefined: A free form category suitable for events that are entirely custom to the producer.

  • Data: an event that represents a change to a record or other item, or a new item. Change events are associated with a create, update, delete, or snapshot operation.

  • Business: an event that is part of, or drives a business process, such as a state transition in a customer order.

The events for the business and data change helper categories follow a generic Nakadi event schema as well as a schema custom to the event data. The generic schema pre-defines common fields for an event and the custom schema for the event is defined when the event type is created. When a JSON event for one of these categories is posted to the server, it is expected to conform to the combination of the generic schema for the category and to the custom schema defined for the event type. This combination is called the effective schema and is validated by Nakadi.

The undefined category is also required to have a JSON schema on creation, but this can be as simple as { "\additionalProperties\": true } to allow arbitrary JSON. Unlike the business and data categories, the schema for an undefined type is not checked by Nakadi when an event is posted, but it can be used by a consumer to validate data on the stream.

Creating Event Types

Create an Event Type

An event type can be created by posting to the event-types resource.

Each event type must have a unique name. If the event type already exists a 409 Conflict response will be returned. Otherwise a successful request will result in a 201 Created response. The exact required fields depend on the event type's category, but name, owning_application and schema are always expected.

The schema value should only declare the custom part of the event - the generic schema is implicit and doesn't need to be defined. The combination of the two (the "effective schema") will be checked when events are submitted for the event type.

This example shows a business category event type with a simple schema for an order number -

curl -v -XPOST http://localhost:8080/event-types -d '{
  "name": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
  "owning_application": "order-service",
  "category": "business",
  "partition_strategy": "random",
  "enrichment_strategies": ["metadata_enrichment"],
  "schema": {
    "type": "json_schema",
    "schema": "{ \"properties\": { \"order_number\": { \"type\": \"string\" } } }"
  }
}'

This example shows an undefined category event type with a wilcard schema -

curl -v -XPOST http://localhost:8080/event-types -d '{
  "name": "undef",
  "owning_application": "jinteki",
  "category": "undefined",
  "partition_strategy": "random",
  "schema": {
    "type": "json_schema",
    "schema": "{ \"additionalProperties\": true }"
  }
}'

An undefined event does not accept a value for enrichment_strategies.

List Event Types

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8

[
  {
    "category": "business",
    "default_statistic": null,
    "enrichment_strategies": ["metadata_enrichment"],
    "name": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
    "owning_application": "order-service",
    "partition_key_fields": [],
    "partition_strategy": "random",
    "schema": {
      "schema": "{ \"properties\": { \"order_number\": { \"type\": \"string\" } } }",
      "type": "json_schema"
    }
  }
]

View an Event Type

Each event type registered with Nakadi has a URI based on its name -

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8

{
  "category": "business",
  "default_statistic": null,
  "enrichment_strategies": ["metadata_enrichment"],
  "name": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
  "owning_application": "order-service",
  "partition_key_fields": [],
  "partition_strategy": "random",
  "schema": {
    "schema": "{ \"properties\": { \"order_number\": { \"type\": \"string\" } } }",
    "type": "json_schema"
  }
}

List Partitions for an Event Type

The partitions for an event type are available via its /partitions resource:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/partitions 

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8

[
  {
    "newest_available_offset": "BEGIN",
    "oldest_available_offset": "0",
    "partition": "0"
  }
]

View a Partition for an Event Type

Each partition for an event type has a URI based on its partition value:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/partitions/0 

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8

{
  "newest_available_offset": "BEGIN",
  "oldest_available_offset": "0",
  "partition": "0"
}

Publishing Events

Posting one or more Events

Events for an event type can be published by posting to its "events" collection:

curl -v -XPOST http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events -d '[
  {
    "order_number": "24873243241",
    "metadata": {
      "eid": "d765de34-09c0-4bbb-8b1e-7160a33a0791",
      "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:47:15+01:00"
    }
  }, {
    "order_number": "24873243242",
    "metadata": {
      "eid": "a7671c51-49d1-48e6-bb03-b50dcf14f3d3",
      "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:47:16+01:00"
    }
  }]'

HTTP/1.1 200 OK  

The events collection accepts an array of events. As well as the fields defined in the event type's schema, the posted event must also contain a metadata object with an eid and occurred_at fields. The eid is a UUID that uniquely identifies an event and the occurred_at field identifies the time of creation of the Event defined by the producer.

Note that the order of events in the posted array will be the order they are published onto the event stream and seen by consumers. They are not re-ordered based on their occurred_at or other data values.

Consuming Events

Opening an Event Stream

You can open a stream for an Event Type via the events sub-resource:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events 

Event Stream Structure

The stream response groups events into batches. Batches in the response are separated by a newline and each batch will be emitted on a single line, but a pretty-printed batch object looks like this -

{
  "cursor": {
    "partition": "0",
    "offset": "4"
  },
  "events": [{
    "order_number": "24873243241",
    "metadata": {
      "eid": "d765de34-09c0-4bbb-8b1e-7160a33a0791",
      "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:47:15+01:00"
    }
  }, {
    "order_number": "24873243242",
    "metadata": {
      "eid": "a7671c51-49d1-48e6-bb03-b50dcf14f3d3",
      "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:47:16+01:00"
    }
  }]
} 

The cursor object describes the partition and the offset for this batch of events. The cursor allow clients to checkpoint which events have already been consumed and navigate through the stream - individual events in the stream don't have cursors. The events array contains a list of events that were published in the order they were posted by the producer. Each event will contain a metadata field as well as the custom data defined by the event type's schema.

The HTTP response then will look something like this -

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events 

HTTP/1.1 200 OK

{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"4"},"events":[{"order_number": "ORDER_001", "metadata": {"eid": "4ae5011e-eb01-11e5-8b4a-1c6f65464fc6", "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:56:11+01:00"}}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"5"},"events":[{"order_number": "ORDER_002", "metadata": {"eid": "4bea74a4-eb01-11e5-9efa-1c6f65464fc6", "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:57:15+01:00"}}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"},"events":[{"order_number": "ORDER_003", "metadata": {"eid": "4cc6d2f0-eb01-11e5-b606-1c6f65464fc6", "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:58:15+01:00"}}]}

Cursors, Offsets and Partitions

By default the events resource will consume from all partitions of an event type and from the end (or "tail") of the stream. To select only particular partitions and a position where in the stream to start, you can supply an X-Nakadi-Cursors header in the request:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events \
  -H 'X-Nakadi-Cursors: [{"partition": "0", "offset":"12"}]'

The header value is a JSON array of cursors. Each cursor in the array describes its partition for the stream and an offset to stream from. Note that events within the same partition maintain their overall order.

The offset value of the cursor allows you select where the in the stream you want to consume from. This can be any known offset value, or the dedicated value BEGIN which will start the stream from the beginning. For example, to read from partition 0 from the beginning:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events \
  -H 'X-Nakadi-Cursors:[{"partition": "0", "offset":"BEGIN"}]'

The details of the partitions and their offsets for an event type are available via its partitions resource.

Event Stream Keepalives

If there are no events to be delivered Nakadi will keep a streaming connection open by periodically sending a batch with no events but which contains a cursor pointing to the current offset. For example:

curl -v http://localhost:8080/event-types/order.ORDER_RECEIVED/events 

HTTP/1.1 200 OK

{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"},"events":[{"order_number": "ORDER_003", "metadata": {"eid": "4cc6d2f0-eb01-11e5-b606-1c6f65464fc6", "occurred_at": "2016-03-15T23:58:15+01:00"}}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"}}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"}}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"}}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"6"}}

This can be treated as a keep-alive control for some load balancers.

Subscriptions

Subscriptions allow clients to consume events, where the Nakadi server store offsets and automatically manages reblancing of partitions across consumer clients. This allows clients to avoid managing stream state locally.

The typical workflow when using subscriptions is:

  1. Create a Subscription specifying the event-types* you want to read.

  2. Start reading batches of events from the subscription.

  3. Commit the cursors found in the event batches back to Nakadi, which will store the offsets.

* Note: the API signature can support subscribing to multiple event types with a single subscription, but this is not implemented yet; it's planned to be enabled soon.

If the connection is closed, and later restarted, clients will get events from the point of your last cursor commit. If you need more than one client for your subscription to distribute the load you can read the subscription with multiple clients and Nakadi will balance the load across them.

The following sections provide more detail on the Subscription API and basic examples of Subscription API creation and usage:

For a more detailed description and advanced configuration options please take a look at Nakadi swagger file.

Creating Subscriptions

A Subscription can be created by posting to the /subscriptions collection resource:

curl -v -XPOST "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions" -H "Content-type: application/json" -d '{
    "owning_application": "order-service",
    "event_types": ["order.ORDER_RECEIVED"]
  }'    

The response returns the whole Subscription object that was created, including the server generated id field:

HTTP/1.1 201 Created
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8

{
  "owning_application": "order-service",
  "event_types": [
    "order.ORDER_RECEIVED"
  ],
  "consumer_group": "default",
  "read_from": "end",
  "id": "038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f",
  "created_at": "2016-09-23T16:35:13.273Z"
}

Consuming Events from a Subscription

Consuming events is done by sending a GET request to the Subscriptions's event resource (/subscriptions/{subscription-id}/events):

curl -v -XGET "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f/events"

The response is a stream that groups events into JSON batches separated by an endline (\n) character. The output looks like this:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
X-Nakadi-StreamId: 70779f46-950d-4e48-9fca-10c413845e7f
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

{"cursor":{"partition":"5","offset":"543","event_type":"order.ORDER_RECEIVED","cursor_token":"b75c3102-98a4-4385-a5fd-b96f1d7872f2"},"events":[{"metadata":{"occurred_at":"1996-10-15T16:39:57+07:00","eid":"1f5a76d8-db49-4144-ace7-e683e8ff4ba4","event_type":"aruha-test-hila","partition":"5","received_at":"2016-09-30T09:19:00.525Z","flow_id":"blahbloh"},"data_op":"C","data":{"order_number":"abc","id":"111"},"data_type":"blah"},"info":{"debug":"Stream started"}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"5","offset":"544","event_type":"order.ORDER_RECEIVED","cursor_token":"a28568a9-1ca0-4d9f-b519-dd6dd4b7a610"},"events":[{"metadata":{"occurred_at":"1996-10-15T16:39:57+07:00","eid":"1f5a76d8-db49-4144-ace7-e683e8ff4ba4","event_type":"aruha-test-hila","partition":"5","received_at":"2016-09-30T09:19:00.741Z","flow_id":"blahbloh"},"data_op":"C","data":{"order_number":"abc","id":"111"},"data_type":"blah"}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"5","offset":"545","event_type":"order.ORDER_RECEIVED","cursor_token":"a241c147-c186-49ad-a96e-f1e8566de738"},"events":[{"metadata":{"occurred_at":"1996-10-15T16:39:57+07:00","eid":"1f5a76d8-db49-4144-ace7-e683e8ff4ba4","event_type":"aruha-test-hila","partition":"5","received_at":"2016-09-30T09:19:00.741Z","flow_id":"blahbloh"},"data_op":"C","data":{"order_number":"abc","id":"111"},"data_type":"blah"}]}
{"cursor":{"partition":"0","offset":"545","event_type":"order.ORDER_RECEIVED","cursor_token":"bf6ee7a9-0fe5-4946-b6d6-30895baf0599"}}
{"cursor":{"partition":"1","offset":"545","event_type":"order.ORDER_RECEIVED","cursor_token":"9ed8058a-95be-4611-a33d-f862d6dc4af5"}}

Each batch contains the following fields:

  • cursor: The cursor of the batch which should be used for committing the batch.

  • events: The array of events of this batch.

  • info: An optional field that can hold useful information (e.g. the reason why the stream was closed by Nakadi).

Please also note that when stream is started, the client receives a header X-Nakadi-StreamId which must be used when committing cursors.

To see a full list of parameters that can be used to control a stream of events, please see an API specification in swagger file.

Client Rebalancing

If you need more than one client for your subscription to distribute load or increase throughput - you can read the subscription with multiple clients and Nakadi will automatically balance the load across them.

The balancing unit is the partition, so the number of clients of your subscription can't be higher than the total number of all partitions of the event-types of your subscription.

For example, suppose you had a subscription for two event-types A and B, with 2 and 4 partitions respectively. If you start reading events with a single client, then the client will get events from all 6 partitions. If a second client connects, then 3 partitions will be transferred from first client to a second client, resulting in each client consuming 3 partitions. In this case, the maximum possible number of clients for the subscription is 6, where each client will be allocated 1 partition to consume.

The Subscription API provides a guarantee of at-least-once delivery. In practice this means clients can see a duplicate event in the case where there are errors committing events. However the events which were successfully committed will not be resent.

A useful technique to detect and handle duplicate events on consumer side is to be idempotent and to check eid field of event metadata. Note: eid checking is not possible using the "undefined" category, as it's only supplied in the "business" and "data" categories.

Subscription Cursors

The cursors in the Subscription API have the following structure:

{
  "partition": "5",
  "offset": "543",
  "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
  "cursor_token": "b75c3102-98a4-4385-a5fd-b96f1d7872f2"
}

The fields are:

  • partition: The partition this batch belongs to. A batch can only have one partition.

  • offset: The offset of this batch. The offset is server defined and opaque to the client - clients should not try to infer or assume a structure.

  • event_type: Specifies the event-type of the cursor (as in one stream there can be events of different event-types);

  • cursor_token: The cursor token generated by Nakadi.

Committing Cursors

Cursors can be committed by posting to Subscription's cursor resource (/subscriptions/{subscriptionId}/cursors), for example:

curl -v -XPOST "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f/cursors"\
  -H "X-Nakadi-StreamId: ae1e39c3-219d-49a9-b444-777b4b03e84c" \
  -H "Content-type: application/json" \
  -d '{
    "items": [
      {
        "partition": "0",
        "offset": "543",
        "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
        "cursor_token": "b75c3102-98a4-4385-a5fd-b96f1d7872f2"
      },
      {
        "partition": "1",
        "offset": "923",
        "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
        "cursor_token": "a28568a9-1ca0-4d9f-b519-dd6dd4b7a610"
      }
    ]
  }'

Please be aware that X-Nakadi-StreamId header is required when doing a commit. The value should be the same as you get in X-Nakadi-StreamId header when opening a stream of events. Also, each client can commit only the batches that were sent to it.

The possible successful responses for a commit are:

  • 204: cursors were successfully committed and offset was increased.

  • 200: cursors were committed but at least one of the cursors didn't increase the offset as it was less or equal to already committed one. In a case of this response code user will get a json in a response body with a list of cursors and the results of their commits.

The timeout for commit is 60 seconds. If you open the stream, read data and don't commit anything for 60 seconds - the stream connection will be closed from Nakadi side. Please note that if there are no events available to send and you get only empty batches - there is no need to commit, Nakadi will close connection only if there is some uncommitted data and no commits happened for 60 seconds.

If the connection is closed for some reason then the client still has 60 seconds to commit the events it received from the moment when the events were sent. After that the session will be considered closed and it will be not possible to do commits with that X-Nakadi-StreamId. If the commit was not done - then the next time you start reading from a subscription you will get data from the last point of your commit, and you will again receive the events you haven't committed.

When a rebalance happens and a partition is transferred to another client - the commit timeout of 60 seconds saves the day again. The first client will have 60 seconds to do the commit for that partition, after that the partition is started to stream to a new client. So if the commit wasn't done in 60 seconds then the streaming will start from a point of last successful commit. In other case if the commit was done by the first client - the data from this partition will be immediately streamed to second client (because there is no uncommitted data left and there is no need to wait any more).

It is not necessary to commit each batch. When the cursor is committed, all events that are before this cursor in the partition will also be considered committed. For example suppose the offset was at e0 in the stream below,

partition: [ e0 | e1 | e2 | e3 | e4 | e5 | e6 | e7 | e8 | e9 ]
     offset--^

and the stream sent back three batches to the client, where the client committed batch 3 but not batch 1 or batch 2,

partition: [ e0 | e1 | e2 | e3 | e4 | e5 | e6 | e7 | e8 | e9 ]
     offset--^       
                |--- batch1 ---|--- batch2 ---|--- batch3 ---|
                        |             |               |
                        v             |               | 
                [ e1 | e2 | e3 ]      |               |
                                      v               |
                               [ e4 | e5 | e6 ]       |
                                                      v
                                              [ e7 | e8 | e9 ]

client: cursor commit --> |--- batch3 ---|

then the offset will be moved all the way up to e9 implicitly committing all the events that were in the previous batches 1 and 2,

partition: [ e0 | e1 | e2 | e3 | e4 | e5 | e6 | e7 | e8 | e9 ]
                                                          ^-- offset

Checking Current Position

You can also check the current position of your subscription:

curl -v -XGET "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f/cursors"

The response will be a list of current cursors that reflect the last committed offsets:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
{
  "items": [
    {
      "partition": "0",
      "offset": "8361",
      "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
      "cursor_token": "35e7480a-ecd3-488a-8973-3aecd3b678ad"
    },
    {
      "partition": "1",
      "offset": "6214",
      "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
      "cursor_token": "d1e5d85e-1d8d-4a22-815d-1be1c8c65c84"
    }
  ]
}

Subscription Statistics

The API also provides statistics on your subscription:

curl -v -XGET "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f/stats"

The output will contain the statistics for all partitions of the stream:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
{
  "items": [
    {
      "event_type": "order.ORDER_RECEIVED",
      "partitions": [
        {
          "partition": "0",
          "state": "reassigning",
          "unconsumed_events": 2115,
          "stream_id": "b75c3102-98a4-4385-a5fd-b96f1d7872f2"
        },
        {
          "partition": "1",
          "state": "assigned",
          "unconsumed_events": 1029,
          "stream_id": "ae1e39c3-219d-49a9-b444-777b4b03e84c"
        }
      ]
    }
  ]
}

Deleting a Subscription

To delete a Subscription, send a DELETE request to the Subscription resource using its id field (/subscriptions/{id}):

curl -v -X DELETE "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f"

Successful response:

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content

Getting and Listing Subscriptions

To view a Subscription send a GET request to the Subscription resource resource using its id field (/subscriptions/{id}): :

curl -v -XGET "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions/038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f"

Successful response:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
{
  "owning_application": "order-service",
  "event_types": [
    "order.ORDER_RECEIVED"
  ],
  "consumer_group": "default",
  "read_from": "end",
  "id": "038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f",
  "created_at": "2016-09-23T16:35:13.273Z"
}

To get a list of subscriptions send a GET request to the Subscription collection resource:

curl -v -XGET "http://localhost:8080/subscriptions"

Example answer:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
{
  "items": [
    {
      "owning_application": "order-service",
      "event_types": [
        "order.ORDER_RECEIVED"
      ],
      "consumer_group": "default",
      "read_from": "end",
      "id": "038fc871-1d2c-4e2e-aa29-1579e8f2e71f",
      "created_at": "2016-09-23T16:35:13.273Z"
    }
  ],
  "_links": {
    "next": {
      "href": "/subscriptions?offset=20&limit=20"
    }
  }
}

It's possible to filter the list with the following parameters: event_type, owning_application.
Also, the following pagination parameters are available: offset, limit.

Build and Development

Building

The project is built with Gradle. The ./gradlew wrapper script will bootstrap the right Gradle version if it's not already installed.

The gradle setup is fairly standard, the main tasks are:

  • ./gradlew build: run a build and test
  • ./gradlew clean: clean down the build

Some other useful tasks are:

  • ./gradlew acceptanceTest: run the ATs
  • ./gradlew fullAcceptanceTest: run the ATs in the context of Docker
  • ./gradlew startNakadi: build Nakadi and start docker-compose services: nakadi, postgresql, zookeeper and kafka
  • ./gradlew stopNakadi: shutdown docker-compose services
  • ./gradlew startStorages: start docker-compose services: postgres, zookeeper and kafka (useful for development purposes)
  • ./gradlew stopStorages: shutdown docker-compose services

For working with an IDE, the eclipse IDE task is available and you'll be able to import the build.gradle into Intellij IDEA directly.

Dependencies

The Nakadi server is a Java 8 Spring Boot application. It uses Kafka 0.9 as its broker and PostgreSQL 9.5 as its supporting database.

Nakadi requires recent versions of docker and docker-compose. In particular, docker-compose >= v1.7.0 is required. See Install Docker Compose for information on installing the most recent docker-compose version.

What does the project already implement?

  • [x] REST abstraction over Kafka-like queues
  • [x] creation of event types
  • [x] low-level interface
    • manual client side partition management is needed
    • no support of commits
  • [x] high-level interface (Subscription API)
    • automatic redistribution of partitions between consuming clients
    • commits should be issued to move server-side cursors
  • [ ] Support of event filtering per subscriptions

Contributing

Nakadi accepts contributions from the open-source community. Please see the issue tracker for things to work on.

Before making a contribution, please let us know by posting a comment to the relevant issue. And if you would like to propose a new feature, do start a new issue explaining the feature you’d like to contribute.

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